Free Prepping Series, Part 3: Community

Many preppers think the best policy is to keep prepping secret and to not discuss things with “everyone”.

Here at The Daily Prepper News, we agree and disagree.  There’s a reason the phrase “no man is an island” exists.  No one can do everything on his own.  This is the foundation for every society.

Sure, people can “survive” on their own in the wilderness, if they don’t mind eating bugs and wearing animal skins, if they are available.  Aside from the “eewww” factor, it is just surviving.  Not living.  No enjoyment in life that family and friends bring.  In such an existence every minute is spent either resting when possible, finding food and water and finding shelter.  When SHTF, is it possible the loner will be living a nomadic life finding food, water and shelter wherever possible?  No that sounds like a bunch of living dead.

Prepping in Your Community

Even if your family is prepared for an event, it is just that.

One family.  Everyone needs human interaction with people outside the family unit, especially teenagers.  Without the social aspect problems arise.

If you join a network of like-minded people your skill pool will increase.  The labor force available to you increases as does the labor force of the whole group when you throw your labor into the mix.  This helps get big projects done for more people.  It also serves to teach skills to all members of the group.

Security is one of the main reasons groups band together.  It’s much harder to attack a whole city than a single home.  This is how communities formed from the beginning.  People recognized early on that survival meant helping each other.  Indeed, it is stated in the documents and letters about the forming of a union for the mutual defense of the newly formed states.  They decided to trust each other for this purpose.

Trust is earned over time.  Trust is not always reciprocal.

Not everyone is trustworthy.  Some people can’t tell the difference between those who are trustworthy and those who are not trustworthy.  Some people don’t trust any one for any reason.  Other people trust a person until they are given a reason not to.  In this respect, we agree that you shouldn’t reveal everything.  Some things need to be kept close.

With all that being said, it is important to realize that a network of people will be your best help in a time of crisis.

You can count on them and they can count on you.

If something happens and your stores are destroyed during an event, your group should take you in because they would want you to take them in if it happened to them.  A well organized group will have contingency plans for such events.

While legitimate arguments can be made about each person only using his own preps, one needs to consider their humanity and the person they are at the core of their being.  Sharing with those who share with you is a good thing.  Defending each other against marauders is a good thing.

Meeting other people who prepare for when SHTF doesn’t cost you anything and can have immense rewards.  Just knowing who the go-to people are will be a great bonus for your own prepping experience.  Having them identify you as a go-to person for some skill or knowledge you have will be a bonus to you.  It will be a measurement of how well respected you are in the prepper community.

In the final analysis, finding common ground in your local community where you can meet with other forward planning groups will only enhance your life.  Meetings of this sort happen all the time in local meeting halls or parks.  Nothing says you have to continue with the group if you later decide it isn’t for you.  But if you wait until after SHTF, it will be too late to join a group.  Most people will be not be trusted and will likely be seen as opportunistic and possibly dangerous.

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photo by: nosha